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BOOK - JOHN FASSBINDER Exhibition Catalog

$20.00

Image of BOOK - JOHN FASSBINDER Exhibition Catalog
  • Image of BOOK - JOHN FASSBINDER Exhibition Catalog
  • Image of BOOK - JOHN FASSBINDER Exhibition Catalog
  • Image of BOOK - JOHN FASSBINDER Exhibition Catalog
  • Image of BOOK - JOHN FASSBINDER Exhibition Catalog

John Fassbinder (1931 – 2014)

John Fassbinder's pottery is notable for its sensitive color and exquisite design. His interest in painting has made his ceramic work elegantly distinctive in that it is at once totally utilitarian and esthetically commanding. Curated by Claremont Heritage Director, David Shearer, the exhibition Earth + Sky will feature ceramics and paintings from over four decades of work and from several private collections. A number of pieces will also be available for sale.

John Fassbinder was born on August 6, 1931 in Washington State to Mark and Martha Fassbinder. He earned his bachelor’s degree in art at the University of Washington in Seattle where he studied with Robert Sperry and Paul Bonifas, pioneers in the American Studio Craft movement.

Mr. Fassbinder earned his MFA in ceramics at Claremont Graduate School in 1960. He taught at Central Washington College and then, in 1963, was hired as an art instructor at Chouinard Art School. There, he taught ceramics, drawing and painting and served as assistant chairman of the ceramics department.
Next, Mr. Fassbinder was hired at Pomona College where he taught for 11 years. His courses included ceramics and drawing and, later, the college’s first computer graphics classes. He also taught at Scripps College and was a part-time faculty member at Citrus Community College for several years.

Mr. Fassbinder was also a working artist. Known for his beautiful and original ceramics, he rented a studio on Baseline Road in Claremont. Working with traditional materials and techniques, he fashioned works of art that were elegantly distinctive and utilitarian. He found inspiration in nature.
He turned out a never-ending array of housewares like vases, jugs, goblets, plates and pitchers, all imprinted with his signature. He favored vivid glazes and decorations both abstract and figurative. A prime example of his work—a stoneware platter emblazoned with a fiery iron-oxide sun rising over a cobalt-glazed ocean—is represented in the permanent collection of the American Museum of Ceramic Art in Pomona.

22 pages 6" x 8" perfect bound